Freedom of Association Tag

19 Mar 2021 BC Supreme Court Upholds COVID-19 Restrictions on Worship Services

In a disappointing ruling released last night, the Chief Justice of the Supreme Court of British Columbia upheld the prohibition of in-person worship services. These restrictions were first implemented on November 19th, 2020, and continue to this day. Many Christians will be very disappointed, perhaps even angry, with this decision. Reformed Christians have an earnest, deeply-held belief that they must both respect the governing authorities and gather regularly to worship with other believers. The absolute prohibition of in-person worship services placed many Christians in an unfair dilemma, making it very difficult...

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05 Sep 2017 Supreme Court Appearances

[vc_row row_type="row" use_row_as_full_screen_section="no" type="full_width" angled_section="no" text_align="left" background_image_as_pattern="without_pattern" css_animation=""][vc_column width="1/4"][vc_single_image image="1824" img_size="medium" add_caption="yes" qode_css_animation=""][/vc_column][vc_column width="3/4"][vc_column_text]ARPA has two appearances coming before the Supreme Court of Canada between now and the end of the year. Late last month, we were granted formal "intervenor status" in what is known as the "Wall case". This case involves a Jehovah's Witness congregation in Alberta that dis-fellowshipped - essentially excommunicated - one of its members. ARPA's Director of Law and Policy, André Schutten, says the case sets boundaries around the authority of the state when it comes...

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31 Aug 2013 André Schutten: Ottawa Citizen Editorial

The following article by ARPA's Legal Counsel André Schutten was published in the Ottawa Citizen on August 23, 2013: For a democracy to flourish, governments must respect the fundamental freedoms of its citizens, four of which are outlined in section 2 of the Charter of Rights and Freedoms. The first one, freedom of religion, and the fourth one, freedom of association, are especially important in the discussion surrounding the recent decision by Christian Horizons to open its employment to any and all. Christian Horizons is a Christian charity that provides assistance to people living with special needs, especially those with complex developmental disabilities and challenges. It is the largest of hundreds of different organizations that contract with the Ontario government to provide these types of specialized care services. Christian Horizons, until this week, limited its hiring to Christian employees as defined by a statement of faith. It should be noted that Christian Horizons actually eliminated their morality and lifestyle code already a few years ago - the decision this week was to remove the statement of faith requirement for front line workers. The Citizen, in an editorial published earlier this week, suggested that "under no circumstances should a charity that is largely funded by taxpayers be allowed to impose its moral values on everyone else." I agree with this statement. The question then is this: was Christian Horizons imposing its moral values on everyone else? In my view, it wasn't. It was only imposing its moral values on itself.
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06 Sep 2012 Tory MP calls for new rules that would allow public servants to opt out of union dues (2)

Globe and Mail, Sept 6 2012: An Ottawa-area Conservative MP says Canada’s largest union of federal public servants shouldn’t have endorsed separatist parties during the Quebec election and is calling for new rules allowing members to opt out of paying dues. The proposal from MP Pierre Poilievre is similar to “right-to-work” legislation that has been adopted by more than 20 U.S. states, provoking heated debate and resistance from unions. “I cannot imagine how it could possibly be in the interests of a Canadian public servant for the union to back...

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06 Sep 2012 Tory MP calls for new rules that would allow public servants to opt out of union dues (2)

Globe and Mail, Sept 6 2012: An Ottawa-area Conservative MP says Canada’s largest union of federal public servants shouldn’t have endorsed separatist parties during the Quebec election and is calling for new rules allowing members to opt out of paying dues. The proposal from MP Pierre Poilievre is similar to “right-to-work” legislation that has been adopted by more than 20 U.S. states, provoking heated debate and resistance from unions. “I cannot imagine how it could possibly be in the interests of a Canadian public servant for the union to back...

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28 Sep 2011 URC Businessman at Centre of Human Rights Complaint

ARPA Note: This is not the first case of a Reformed business person who has been charged with a human rights complaint. Learn more about the HRC's here, and attached to this posting find our article about how to apply our faith in the business world in an age of human rights complaints. AM 980: A human rights complaint is in the process of being filed against the Trails End Farmer's Market on Dundas Street because of an ultimatum issued to a vendor to remove a transgendered employee...

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09 Dec 2010 A little Orwell with your union dues?

Karen Salick (Canadian Constitution Foundation) Winnipeg Free Press, December 9, 2010:  Historically, labour unions have done a remarkable job of persuading the general public that unions toil for the benefit of the average worker.  But in a case currently unfolding in Alberta, a group of 29 average workers has rejected that thesis, and the union doesn’t like it.
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